Week ending 15 February 2020: featuring Piotr Damasiewicz & Power of the Horns Ensemble

Click the Listen Again/MixCloud tab to hear a programme of recent music – mostly issued in 2019 – and including more of the fantastic Polish music featured last week.

The show began with music from a group led by Michael Janisch, a US bass player now resident in London. Worlds Collide is an exciting, contemporary album, certainly not easy listening but well worth it and so recommended. The music reflects the cosmopolitan flavour of both the London scene and the city itself. It’s on the Whirlwind Recordings label – run by Janisch himself. Check out the label for more interesting releases.

Many of us first came across UK sax player Binker Golding through his collaborations with drummer Moses Boyd. Last year he released his own quartet’s album Abstractions of Reality Past and Incredible FeathersIt seems that the more it is heard and talked about, the more people realise just how good it is. February 2020’s Jazzwise magazine has an interview with Golding in which he talks about his music past and present – and it’s a fascinating read. The new album is in the acoustic, melodic jazz tradition – surprising given Golding’s past connections with rhythm driven music. Add musicians like keyboardist Joe Armon-Jones into the mix and expectations are of – well – more of that Nubya Garcia, Theon Cross, Ezra Collective style scene. Indeed, it would have been easy to plough this furrow, but in the Jazzwise interview Golding acknowledges I know what the zeitgeist is because I partially created it with Moses. True enough, and so Golding has taken a very different direction: the results sound more Shorter or Sonny than London jazz rapper Kano or the afrobeat influenced Kokoroko. Abstractions… is one of our Cosmic Jazz favourites from 2019 and we shall no doubt features more tracks through 2020. Strong melodies, inspired solos and a real quartet sound with individual voices filtered through a 1960s jazz soundscape. Add in the usual Gearbox Records superb mastering and you have a record you will return to again again. Very  highly recommended.

Last week the show had music for the first time from Polish trumpeter Piotr Damasiewicz & Power of the Horns Ensemble. More of this had to be played. The band is a collective of first-rate musicians playing music that is powerful, free and intense.  CJ last week had a taste of one of the cuts from this album – this week we played all of Psalm for William Parker in its impressive entirety along with  Polska 1 –  both from the new album Polskathe first release from the band since 2013. Again, this album is very highly recommended. Check it out via the always reliable Steve’s Jazz Sounds.

Also from Poland are the Tubis Trio. Led by pianist Maciej Tubis and with the classic format of piano,  double bass and drums, the album So Us is impressive. There are nods to Esbjorn Svensson’s EST. and this is undoubtedly a power trio: Maciej Tubis can certainly blow up a storm and bassist Pawel Puszczalo and drummer Przemyslaw Pacan often add their own fiery contributions. Out and About is a pacey but memorably melodic tune, with some impressive quick-fingered piano and Pacan’s solid drumming in the background.

There was more from three contemporary musicians and albums that we have loved. This included the drummer and sound collagist Makaya McCraven whose profile continues to rise both in his native US and here in the UK where he is a frequent collaborator with many of the current crop of British jazz luminaries. His new project is a re-imagining of Gil Scott Heron’s final album I’m New Here and we shall certainly feature this album in upcoming shows.

Hexagonal are a UK sextet who divide the trumpet/flugelhorn slot between Graeme Flowers and Quentin Collins. Their excellent release from 2018, McCoy and Mseleku, features the compositions of John Coltrane’s pianist McCoyTyner and South African multi- instrumentalist Bheki Mseleku who died in 2008. This excellent record also features Jason Yarde on alto and baritone saxes and has a fine rhythm section of Simon Thorpe on bass and Tristan Banks on drums. Thorpe and pianist and arranger John Donaldson both toured with Mseleku, while Jason Yarde worked with McCoy Tyner, and so there are closer links to the source than you might expect. We featured one of McCoy Tyner’s most infectious compositions and a real favourite of ours – Walk Spirit, Talk Spirit. Its rolling piano intro is instantly recognisable and – as Derek noticed – has a South African feel too. Compare with this live take from Tyner at the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1973, subsequently released on Milestone Records as Enlightenment. 

We ended the show this week with another play for Maisha, the UK collective led by drummer Jake Long. There are some familiar faces in this band – notably saxophonist Nubya Gracia and guitarist Shirley Tetteh – but there’s a much more evidently spiritual jazz flavour to this ensemble with a sound that’s clearly indebted to Alice Coltrane and others. But Maisha are more than mere copyists – their album There Is a Place has strong melodies, memorable solos and our featured tune Osiris welds together some diverse influences into a very satisfying whole. Like the Binker Golding album, this is one (especially on vinyl) that you will come back to time and again – it’s that good.

  1. Michael Janisch – Freak Out from World’s Collide
  2. Binker Golding – Forgot Santa Monica from Abstractions of Reality Past and Incredible Feathers
  3. Piotr Damasiewicz & Power of the Horns Ensemble – Psalm for William Parker from Polska
  4. Piotr Damasiewicz and Power of the Horns Ensemble – Polska 1 from Polska
  5. Tubis Trio – Up and About from So Us
  6. Makaya McCraven – Above & Beyond from Highly Rare
  7. Hexagonal – Walk Spirit, Talk Spirit from McCoy & Mseleku
  8. Maisha – Osiris from There is a Place

Derek is listening to….

Neil is listening to…

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