Five from five: CJ favourites 01

This week, Derek has chosen five tunes from five countries that are essential listening for any lover of Cosmic Jazz. First up is a bonafide classic from the USA – and one that will be no surprise if you have followed us here on the show over the years. Black Renaissance is the ultimate jam session and a cult record that has achieved legendary status. With a group led by the then 26 year old pianist Harry Whitaker, the two track album was recorded in New York in 1976. It is free, expressive, wild at and noted for an early proto-rap element too. The record features Woody Shaw, Azar Lawrence, Buster Williams, Billy Hart and Mtume amongst others. Listen here – and and then listen for ever…

No surprises either with our second choice. We love the work of Polish trumpeter Piotr Wojtasik and this track has the bonus of two vocalists – Anna Maria Mbayo and Magdalena Zawartko – as well as a large ensemble of instrumentalists. Stay in Time of Freedom is an uplifting and celebratory ode to freedom and both deep spiritual rejoicing and some likely physical movement will be your inevitable response. The full album Tribute to Akwarium is worthy of your attention too – find it at Steve’s Jazz Sounds along with other great Wojtasik music (and enjoy Steve’s excellent updated site too!).

Our third selection is from revered label Blue Note, but it’s not one of the classic Rudy van Gelder engineered masterpieces from the 1960s. Instead, we head to France and the music of Erik Truffaz. Born in Switzerland, this trumpeter is an innovative minimalist with a desire to search for new contexts for his spaced-out clean sound. The album Bending New Corners contains three tunes featuring a rap from guest Nya, including the masterpiece that is Siegfried. For an idea of where Truffaz is right now, listen to the rich, dark textures of the album Being Human, recorded in collaboration with Mexican electronica artist Murcof – check it out here on Bandcamp.

Our fourth choice is the extraordinary tune Watarase by Japanese pianist and composer Fumio Itabashi. The song is a variation on a traditional Japanese folk melody and is named after the Watarase river in Japan’s Kanto region and showcases Itabashi’s Don Pullen-influenced style. This solo piano album includes three other Itabashi originals and his takes on Someday My Prince Will Come and I Can’t Get Started. Watarase has been reworked by Itabashi over the years, sometimes featuring a full band or vocal accompaniment, though it has never sounded quite as thoughtful or serene as it does here. For the full effect of its mindblowing power though you need to get hold of the double CD album that contains eight versions of this one tune, including this live one with the Kanagawa Symphony Orchestra and vocalist Yuki Kaneko. Be amazed, be truly amazed…

Derek’s final selection is from Jamaica and stretches the boundaries of jazz – but that’s just how we like it on Cosmic Jazz. Jackie Mittoo was a keyboard virtuoso, musical director at the legendary Studio One and a founding member of The Skatalites. An undoubted reggae great but, like many of his Jamaican contemporaries, with considerable jazz influences too. Hear them on Ghetto Organ – a tune derived from a blues standard by Willie Cobbs that can be found on the excellent Macka Fat album.

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