Week ending 02 December 2017: making connections

Jazz musicians are flexible and move around to play in different groups. Often, they need to do so in order to make a living – you have to be very successful to limit your playing to one group only. Even then, the most successful appear as guests on the records of others – as, for example, Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock who appear on the Blue Note All Stars record we have featured on recent shows.

The first three tunes on this week’s Cosmic Jazz illustrated this perfectly. The show began with Otis Brown III and the trumpeter on that record was Keyon Harrold. This was followed by a tune from The Mugician, Keyon Harrold’s sophomore release as leader. Playing sax on that record was Marcus Strickland – who also appeared on the third tune from the Blue Note All Stars. Also with the Blue Note All Stars are Robert Glasper and Derrick Hodge, both of whom played on the Otis Brown III record. Oh, and Keyon Harrold is also featured on Marcus Strickland’s Twi-Life album – another CJ favourite. It sounds complicated, but it’s just part of the interconnected nature of jazz – musicians adding their ‘voice’ to a new context to make music with friends and labelmates. CJ highly recommends all three of these albums as places to start checking out some of the best American new jazz artists.

Having talked on last week’s show about the current crop of British jazz artists, it made sense to revisit one of our favourites from an earlier era. The Don Rendell/Ian Carr Quintet was perhaps the greatest jazz group to come out of the UK in the 1960s. Ian Carr went on to form the jazzrock group Nucleus and become a definitive biographer of Miles Davis. Many of their albums are CJ favourites – for an introduction, start with Dusk Fire or Shades of Blue – reissued on a 2CD set on the excellent BGO label.

I decided to re-visit some old Cosmic Jazz favourites and will from time to time on the show play two tunes from favourite albums. I began this week with an artist who has probably appeared on the show as much as any – alto saxophonist Kenny Garrett. His fine Seeds From the Underground album of 2012 coincided with me seeing a live performance of his group, and so has a particular resonance. Garrett is one of those alto sax players with a very distinctive ‘voice’ – whether it’s his earlier work with Miles Davis or his most recent Mack Avenue label records his sound is immediately recognisable. Check out the title track from one of our favourite albums, Beyond the Wall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Somi is an artist I have played quite frequently on the show, particularly The Lagos Music Salon inspired by her year in Lagos. I have just, however, revisited her 2017 release Petite Afrique and found an impassioned account of the effects of gentrification, with reference to Harlem, New York. Interesting vocals and interesting musical arrangements.

The show this week ended with another excellent piece of contemporary jazz from Poland courtesy of trumpet/flugelhorn player Lukasz Korybalski.

  1. Otis Brown III – The Way (Truth & Life) from The Thought of You
  2. Keyon Harrold – Ethereal Sounds from The Mugician
  3. The Blue Note All Stars – Meanings from Our Point of View
  4. Don Rendell/Ian Carr Quintet – Blue Mosque from Shades of Blue
  5. Kenny Garrett – Boogety Boogety from Seeds from the Underground
  6. Kenny Garrett – Seeds from the Underground from Seeds from the Underground
  7. Somi feat. Aloe Blacc – The Gentry from Petite Afrique
  8. Lukasz Korybalski – Crossing from CMM

Neil is listening to…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *