Category Archives: Features

Week ending 16 May 2020: jazz vloggers and YouTubers

Another week, another Cosmic Jazz. For those of us who like some jazz in our lives, these seem like particularly rich times. Of course, there is no real substitute for live music, but if you’re confined to home then this seems like the ideal time to explore the numerous jazz blogs, websites and Youtube videos out there. So – not really a virtual show this week but instead music inspired by my internet exploration of two of these vlogs.

We’re trawling that deep space online where you never know what you’ll find. Let’s begin with a virtual record store and review site – The ‘In’ Groove is a record store in Phoenix, Arizona that also supplies online, with owner Mike Esposito also taking time out to do video reviews – like this one about his favourite jazz records. Mike is a hifi retailer too and so his focus is on records that sound good – I like the anecdote of the listener who thought that Take Five sounded “too good.” Of course, all of Mike’s choices are of the audiophile variety but there’s some music here that all jazz fans should have. One interesting choice is from saxophonist Nathan Davis on the French Sam label – here’s a promo video for the 3LP live recording. Davis was one of those African-American jazz artists who found himself more accepted and respected in the postwar jazz scene in Paris. Woody Shaw and Kenny Clarke were also part of this set, and you can hear them with Davis on this lovely version of Sconsolato that didn’t make it onto Davis’ 1965 record Peace Treaty, an excellent album and now about to be reissued on the Sam label with that bonus track.

Mike also includes a Three Blind Mice record – a rare label to find in the UK but one revered here in Singapore. It hails from Japan and majors on incredible recording quality – one of my go-to stores here, The Analog Vault, has the Impex re-release box set available for SGD$330 – but it is a 6 record set… For a taste of audiophile nirvana, strap on your best headphones and listen to Aqua Marine from the Isao Suzuki Quartet. Also included in this Best of… list is (predictably) Miles Davis’ Kind of Blue (1959) and Thelonious Monk’s 1963 album Monk’s Dream. You can find both regular and audiophile titles at The Analog Vault and my favourite store here in Singapore, The Jazz Loft.

Ken Micallef reviews jazz records for Downbeat and Jazz Times magazines and also writes for Stereophile magazine. But perhaps he’s best known for his quirky, opinionated Youtube channel posts. His love of jazz is deep and knowledgable and the vlogs from his New York apartment are a great listen. Here he is extolling the virtues of some ‘jazz through the cracks‘ – records that are not well known but well worth a listen. There’s so many records here that are worth looking out for if you’re able to go crate digging. How about this lovely version of Chick Corea’s Litha on the first record Micallef mentions – Stan Getz’s Sweet Rain from 1967… Getz is with Corea on piano, Ron Carter on bass and Grady Tate on drums – what’s not to like? Micallef also features new jazz artists, in this instance flautist Nicole Mitchell. Her Mandorla Awakening II: Emerging Worlds album from 2017 is new jazz to explore. Recorded live at the Museum of Contemporary Arts in Chicago in 2015, there’s an Art Ensemble of Chicago feel to the complex instrumentation, dominant percussion and attendant freedoms given to the players. Check out the opening track Egoes War for a taste of this brilliant, if challenging, record. Easier listening comes from another Micallef recommendation – pianist Tommy Flanagan’s Overseas album, recorded in Stockholm in 1957 and reissued thirty years later (with extra tracks) in 1987 on the Japanese DIW label. Flanagan’s take on Charlie Parker’s Relaxin’ at Camarillo just swings – and that’s Elvin Jones you can hear on brushes. Spend time with Macallef – you’ll learn a lot and come away with some great record recommendations.

Stereophile magazine itself is – of course – available in print and digital versions and there’s much in the latter to entertain any music lover. I particularly like the annual R2D4 (Records to Die For) lists with mini-reviews that encourage you to explore further – and often well outside your genre comfort zone. The best music writing is the kind that persuades you to listen and/or buy, and Stereophile writer do this – often rather too frequently for comfort…

As a New Yorker article from 2018 made clear, “vinyl offers the joys of possessorship: if you go to a store, talk to other music lovers, and buy a record, you are committing to your taste, to your favorite group, to your friends” – and I think that’s any record store buyer’s experience. It is not the same as the simple internet click to secure your latest download. Can you remember where you were when you bought a favourite download? It’s unlikely. In contrast, most vinyl lovers can remember clearly when and where they purchased their most treasured records. The New Yorker piece indicated that those young people buying vinyl now have joined up with two sets of people who never really gave up on the black wax: “the scratchmaster d.j.s deploying vinyl on twin turntables, making music with their hands, and the audiophiles hoarding their LPs from decades ago”. The result is a resurgent vinyl market that has been hit hard by the Covid-19 outbreak, but will hopefully bounce back so that more of us can enjoy that unique crate digging experience – perhaps best captured by this now iconic image from DJ Shadow’s essential 1996 album Endtroducing, which features two of his co-diggers and DJ associates in a record store in Sacramento, California. More great music next week here on Cosmic Jazz – and we leave you with a track from the magnificence that is Endtroducing – Building Steam with a Grain of Salt. Until next week, enjoy!

Neil is listening to…

Derek is listening to…

Week ending 09 May 2020: Covid deaths and new music

This week’s Cosmic Jazz stays with the virtual show format – click on the hyperlinks to listen to the show – and open up twice to listen and read simultaneously! This week, six artists from Neil reflect two more sad Covid-19 deaths but also provide music that’s uplifting and spiritual in scope.

First up is one of the most recent deaths from Covid-19 in the UK – Benedict Chijioke, more commonly known as rapper Ty, was one of the most eloquent musicians of his generation with a Mercury Music Prize nomination for his album Upwards in 2004. Check out Groovement (Part 1) and The Willing for an indication of why we think his work is comparable not just with his international peers but with the work of A Tribe Called Quest or De La Soul. The latter track features the distinctive trap kit sound of Tony Allen – as unmistakable as ever. You can explore much more of Tony Allen’s music in our previous post.

Detroit DJ Mike Huckaby was another recent Covid-19 victim. The phrase ‘taste maker’ is perhaps used rather too loosely, but Huck’s music choices were remarkably influential, not just in the US but in clubs around the world. Ever keen to encourage new talent, Huckaby ran DJ and production workshops in Detroit and beyond, mentoring upcoming talent with a generosity typical of his approach to music. Have a listen to The Jazz Republic for a taste of his deep house sound.

Sometimes a Twitter post or online article can start a search that yields unexpected rewards. I can’t remember how this one started, but I ended up with Maria Rita Stumpf and her Brasileira remixes. The original Brasileira album, released in 1988 and her first recording, was all but lost but has now been rediscovered and remastered. The music features and is inspired by one of Brazil’s ethnic minorities, the Kamaiura.

The complete album is available here on Bandcamp but have a listen to one of the standout tracks – Cantico Brasileira No. 3 (Kamaiura). This tune in turn led me to the remixes – just two tracks, of which this – the same Cantico Brasileira No.3 – is the second. The remix artist is Carrot Green – and here’s another of his stunning transformations, the hypnotic Ponto Das Caboclas from Camila Costa.

To avoid confusion, Cosmic Jazz points out that Maria Rita Stumpf and Maria Rita are not one and the same. Both are Brazilian singers but Maria Rita (full name Maria Rita Camargo Mariano is the daughter of famed singer Ellis Regina and pianist/arranger Cesar Camargo Mariano. Her self-titled debut album was released to some acclaim in 2004 – here’s the Milton Nascimento album opener, A Festa. Since then she’s released half a dozen albums, with 2008’s Samba Meu perhaps the most worthy of further investigation.

Hard bop tenor player Charlie Rouse had a ten year partnership with pianist Thelonious Monk but his own recordings are often surprisingly good too. A new discovery for me was the album Bossa Nova Bacchanal which – at first glance – might look like an attempt to cash in on that 1960s bossa nova craze. But the album is much more than this. For a start, there’s the players – Kenny Burrell on guitar, Willie Bobo on drums and Carlos ‘Patato’ Valdes on congas. The Haitian-influenced Merci Bon Dieu is a good example of the strengths of this record – it’s much more of a jazz than bossa album. Good luck on finding a vinyl copy of this record! Rouse is there on many of Monk’s classic Columbia recordings, including the superlative Monk’s Dream – an album that belongs in every jazz collection. The album opens with a new recording of the title track – check it out here.

DJ Gilles Peterson’s has been making good use of his lockdown situation by delving deep into his phenomenal record collection and presenting a selection of top 20s on his Worldwide FM radio channel. The Brazilian Jazz 20 was especially rewarding with all tracks worthy of your attention. I’ve listened to the programme four times already since it was broadcast earlier this month. Don’t think you’ve missed it either – you can catch up right here. Standout tracks? Too many to mention – but if you don’t know Dom Um Romao’s superb Spirit of the Times record on the Muse label (1975) then listen to Gilles’ choice The Angels and you’ll want to investigate further. Before this album was released, Romao was performing percussion duties in Weather Report – listen to him here on the sinewy Cucumber Slumber from Mysterious Traveller (1974) and with new bass player Alphonso Johnson up in the mix too.

Finally, in the mix this week was something new from Texan (largely) instrumental trio Khruangbin. With a name taken from the Thai word for airplane, their music can be described as a mix of funk, psychedelia, Iranian and Thai styles and – yes – a little jazz too. Their debut album The Universe Smiles on You was widely acclaimed and their sophomore release Con Todo el Mundo went on to be released in a special dub version Hasta el Cielo last year. Out in a few weeks will be their 2020 album Mordechai – from which the chart friendly Time (You and I) is the first release, out in June. The video features UK comedians Stephen K Amos and Lunda Anele-Skosana making sandcastles in some familiar London streets…

Neil is listening to…

Derek is listening to…

What was it about Tony Allen?

Tony Allen – the drummer who created the rhythm behind Afrobeat – died on 30 April in Paris aged 79. Brian Eno famously called him “perhaps the greatest drummer who has ever lived” – but not for the reasons you might expect. Tony Allen was not one to showboat or solo but he created a deceptively simple syncopation that became the infectious base for the most influential beat to emerge from the African continent – just called Afrobeat. Rather like the Winstons’ famous ‘Amen break‘ Tony Allen’s Afrobeat has shimmied its way around the world since its spiritual master Fela Kuti acknowledged that, “without Tony Allen, there would be no Afrobeat.” The thing is – and in whatever context – when Allen played just a few opening bars, you knew that this immediately recognisable sound must be him.

Listen to a few examples just to prove the point. Sebastian Tellier’s La Ritournelle isn’t Afrobeat – but this could only be Tony Allen. Similarly, Charlotte Gainsbourg’s 5:55 is nowhere near it – but Tony Allen is unmistakeable. So how did this start?

Allen was born in Lagos, Nigeria and was largely self taught as a drummer. He had grown up listening to the dominant juju style, but American jazz was a big influence too – drummers Art Blakey and Max Roach in particular. When he came across the sounds of Ghanaian drummer Guy Warren (later known as Kofi Ghanaba), Allen realised that you could mix Nigerian and Ghanaian tribal drum rhythms with bop idioms. Soon he was hired by Sir Victor Olaiya to play drums with his Cool Cats group (left). Allen later gave a nod to the start of his drumming career on on the track Cool Cats from his 2017 album The Source.

When Fela Kuti invited Allen to audition for a new group he was forming the two soon became a partnership. “How come you are the only guy in Nigeria who plays like this – jazz and highlife?” Kuti asked him. The pair formed the Koola Lobitos group, playing a mix of highlife, traditional Yoruba music, jazz, funk, salsa and calypso driven by Allen’s polyrhythmic beats. Fela would later give this musical stew the name Afrobeat and with his dazzling arrangements, charismatic personality, and explicit human rights activism, Fela Kuti and Afrika ’70 could only succeed. The result was an unparalled period of creativity resulting in over thirty Fela albums that featured Allen but was ended by Fela’s ego and his control over rights and royalties. Allen took some key members of Afrika ’70 with him and the result was some fine recordings, including the superb N.E.P.A. (or Never Expect Power Only – the alternative acronym for the Nigerian Electrical Power Authority). Here’s When One Road Close as an example of this more punchy style – complete with dub effects too.

This experimentation was the start of a period in which Allen deconstructed Afrobeat, fusing it with electronica, dub and rap. But the jazz roots were never far away and in 2017 came Allen’s tribute to Art Blakey – and this Afrobeat take on the classic Moanin’ has that syncopated drum sound right there from the start. And as Allen continued to release albums that expanded on his Afrobeat origins his last release from March 2020 was a much delayed project with the late Hugh Masekela appropriately titled Rejoice – here’s the wonderful Slow Bones. Now, continue your celebration of the life and music of this true legend – choose any track from the list below. You won’t be disappointed.

More Tony Allen…

Record store lockdown: UK and Singapore

These are difficult times for record stores around the world. On Cosmic Jazz we have always supported independent shops and suppliers. For them, Record Store Day is an important event in the calendar but this year the scheduled date of 18 April passed by with online orders only. Although a new date of 20 June has been scheduled, it’s unlikely that this will be able to be celebrated worldwide. For this post, Derek and Neil have selected three suppliers – for Derek that means two record stores in East Anglia, UK and one online record supplier while for Neil it’s three record stores in Singapore.

Steve’s Jazz Sounds has been a great supporter of the show over many years. It’s an online order source for many types of jazz but has a particular specialism in East European and Scandinavian jazz. Here you will discover many exciting artists you may never have heard of before and you will soon learn that excellent jazz is produced in countries all over Europe and beyond. We’ve found that out for ourselves and have made many discoveries resulting in artists that we now feature regularly on the show. Steve also runs an online soul music store too – not unsurprisingly called Steve’s Soul Sounds – with a similarly eclectic mix of music.

Derek has been a regular visitor to Soundclash in Norwich, a thriving independent record store. Currently closed as a result of the Coronanvirus outbreak, online orders can still be made through the website. Soundclash stocks a wide selection of left field music and vinyl is a speciality. The owner Paul has run the shop since 1991, working in another independent store before then. He has a wide knowledge of the music and is great at tracking down records not in store. Check out the queues outside the shop from a previous Record Store Day!

We last featured Vinyl Hunter on Cosmic Jazz in 2016 not long after the store had opened. Established by Rosie Hunter, it’s a family run record store and cafe. Following the success of the original store in Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, Vinyl Hunter now has three outlets with a further store at the family home near Colchester and an urban specialist store in Tottenham, North London. All the staff are enthusiasts who love the music and it was, for example, quite a surprise to find such a rich selection of Brazilian vinyl in the Bury St. Edmunds store. Again, the shops are closed for now but online orders is the way to go. Vinyl Hunter also stock a range of turntables and vinyl systems, including from UK turntable specialists, Rega – based locally in Essex.

Meanwhile, in Singapore the interest in vinyl probably never went away. When he arrived here in 2016, Neil was involved in supporting a new listening cocktail bar called LongPlay. Located in the hippest corner of the city, LongPlay was the vision of a local hotelier and record collector and boasted an excellent sound system. Sadly ahead of its time, it became an (excellent) Japanese restaurant last year. But there are dozens of thriving record shops in the city and Neil has visited most of them. Some are dedicated to ‘previously loved’ discs while others focus on new vinyl and may well stock turntables or include a cafe too.

Neil’s favourite place to spend an afternoon is The Jazz Loft – a specialist jazz floor in the excellent Retrocrates vinyl store. Owner Cliff Yeo opened up The Jazz Loft in 2018 and this section specialises in jazz vinyl both old and new. If you’re looking for the best selection of classic jazz labels like Blue Note, Prestige, Muse and more then this is the place to come. Cliff is incredibly knowledgeable about jazz and makes regular forays to Japan’s independent record stores to replenish his stocks. There’s a current focus on the Blue Note Tone Poet and Blue Note 80 series of reissues, which we have promoted in Cosmic Jazz recently.

Like some other good record stores in Singapore, Cliff can provide new vinylistas with a complete turntable set up, again focusing on the excellent Rega turntables. The atmosphere is chilled and designed to focus on the music. You literally kick off your shoes (no outer footwear is allowed in the store) and enjoy the great music on a good playback system. Of course, like all the record stores we are focusing on in this feature, the Coronavirus outbreak has ensured that The Jazz Loft is currently closed but if you visit their Facebook page, you’ll currently get a daily update on what Cliff is playing at home along with a little of his jazz knowledge too.

One of the most high profile record stores in Singapore is the Analog Vault, located in the Esplanade concert hall complex. The Vault has a superb playback system – including a Linn LP12 turntable and Audio Note amplification and speakers and so you’d expect a good range of audiophile labels on display. Established by Singapore businesswoman Sharon Seet in 2015, the store also has occasional DJ sets and hifi promotions. If you’ve got a vinyl addiction, then the Bencoolen and Coleman Street areas of the city make good places to start your crate digging but, if you’re after a good coffee and an excellent choice of new hiphop wax, then head for Choice Cuts, the brainchild of DJ collective Matteblacc. It’s just up the road from The Jazz Loft and there’s also a good selection of contemporary jazz, Brazilian and African vinyl too. DJ Drem also cooks up some fine DJ sets, exhibitions and live bands.

London and other European cities have seen the recent rise of the jazz kissu – a longtime feature of life in Tokyo. We have featured these specialist jazz bars previously on Cosmic Jazz (see here) and have also included a recent Japanese jazz playlist, but you can also check out the excellent Tokyo Jazz Joints site for more on this deep aspect of Japanese culture. If you’re looking to find a good jazz kissu in London then try Brilliant Corners or Spiritland, which has recently expanded to include an outlet on the South Bank arts complex. For similar music bars around the world, check out those listed in this feature in the UK’s Independent newspaper.

Week Ending 11 April 2020: a Herbie special!

Wow! The ever youthful Herbie Hancock is 80 years old. The pianist and jazz ambassador was born on 12 April 1940 in Chicago. Like many jazz pianists, Hancock received a classical musical education, studying from age seven. Such was his talent that his first public recital at the age of 11 was of the first movement of a Mozart piano concerto with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Hancock’s first recordings were with trumpeter Donald Byrd in 1961 but it wasn’t long before Blue Note gave him his first date as leader – Takin’ Off in 1962 – and his first hit with the lead off track Watermelon Man. Regarded as one of the most accomplished debuts in jazz, Takin’ Off is now available as a Blue Note reissue under their Blue Note 80 series. The album caught the attention of the ever-shrewd Miles Davis who quickly incorporated Hancock into his new quintet. Hancock was only 23 at the time – new drummer Tony Williams was just 17.

While in Davis’s band, Hancock found time to record dozens of sessions for the Blue Note label, both under his own name and as a sideman with other musicians including Wayne Shorter, Grant Green, Bobby Hutcherson, Lee Morgan and Freddie Hubbard. Almost all of Hancock’s albums for Blue Note are outstanding – but particular mention must go to the 1964 outing – Inventions and Dimensions which included two Latin percussionists and featured one of my favourite Hancock compositions, the ostinato-driven Succotash. Of course, the most well known album of this period appeared the following year. Maiden Voyage is the archetypal Blue Note album and deserves to be in everyone’s collection. The title track is outstanding but there’s more to enjoy including the often covered Dolphin Dance. The personnel on this Blue Note is Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, George Coleman on tenor sax, Ron Carter on bass and Tony Williams on drums. Maiden Voyage has been covered by many artists including Grant Green on his Alive! album. You can hear this reflective version right here.

Like many jazz artists of the period, Hancock was keen to incorporate electric and then electronic keyboards and, after the R&B inspired Fat Albert Rotunda album from 1969, Hancock moved into fully electronic mode with a trilogy of recordings between 1971 and 1973 – Mwandishi, Crossings and Sextant. This new sextet comprised Hancock, Buster Williams on bass, drummer Billy Hart and a trio of horn players – Eddie Henderson on trumpet, Julian Priester on trombone and multireedist Bennie Maupin. Electronics pioneer Patrick Gleeson was included on the latter two albums and was instrumental (!) in the sound of such compositions as Rain Dance. Two albums with pretty much the same personnel  were recorded under trumpeter Eddie Henderson’s name and are equally worth exploring. Start with the excellent Mars in Libra from the Realization album (1973).

And then came the big breakthrough – the 1974 album Headhunters with four extraordinary tracks, including a radical reworking of Watermelon Man. That intro and outro sound was derived from a field recording of hindewhu music from the Ba-Benzélé tribe of central Africa. Percussionist Bill Summers had heard the music on an ethnomusicology LP, The Music of the Ba-Benzélé Pygmies (1966), by Simha Arom and Genviève Taurelle. The other three cuts are the standouts too, and the 15 minute long Chameleon was to become one of Hancock’s most well known compositions. The follow-up album Thrust from 1974 was almost a successful and just as good. Hancock moved in an ever-further commercial direction with Man-Child and Secrets, each of which contained more superb tracks. I remember buying Man-Child (on vinyl, of course) the moment it came out in 1975 and was blown away by the double bassline and horns in The Traitor.  Like many of Hancock’s albums, it’s one you can return to again and again.

A period of consolidation followed with some superb live albums that saw Hancock’s facility with reworkings of old Blue Note classics alongside more contemporary tracks. The album Sunlight signalled another change of direction though with Hancock – ever enthusiastic about new technology – using a vocoder for the first time. The album also featured iconic bass player Jaco Pastorius on the final cut Good Question. Whilst the subsequent disco-influenced Vocoder albums received a mixed reception, Hancock continued to record with a new version of his Blue Note style VSOP group before the next breakthrough – the first jazz hip-hop tune, 1983’s Rockit from the album Future Shock. Bass player and producer Bill Laswell was to feature significantly on this and three subsequent releases, ending with Perfect Machine in 1988. It would be Hancock’s last album for six years, as he concentrated on other projects. He re-emerged with Dis is Da Drum in 1994 – a curiously-titled and rather neglected album. There’s a debt to classic 90s hip-hop scratching rhythms – easily heard in the track Mojuba – but also some acoustic piano soloing too. Also from this period is the sometimes neglected New Standard album in which Hancock performs the same trick as his mentor Miles Davis was to do a few years later – reinventing pop and rock tunes as jazz standards. Prince in a jazz arrangement? Why not – listen to the excellent Thieves in Temple with the all star band of Michael Brecker on saxes, John Scofield on guitar, Dave Holland on bass, Jack deJohnette on drums and Don Alias on percussion.

A re-reading of Gershwin’s tunes in 1998 that featured a plethora of guest stars also turned out much better than expected and generated a world tour. Nowhere is the album more surprising than on Duke Ellington’s Cotton Tail, itself a reworking of I Got Rhythm. Wayne Shorter is outstanding. The electronic album that followed Gershwin’s World, Future2Future, turned out to be rather less successful and 2005’s Possibilities took the guest star quotient rather too far.

But help was at hand through Hancock’s longtime friendship with singer Joni Mitchell, herself no stranger to jazz. River: the Joni Letters was a real return to form. Guest vocalists, including Corinne Bailey Rae on the title track, were accompanied by some beautiful piano from Hancock. Mitchell herself made an appearance but Norah Jones and Tina Turner (on Edith and the Kingpin) were almost equally effective. The distinctive tenor solo on this track is (of course) by Wayne Shorter and Prince plays (uncredited) guitar. River justifiably won the 2008 Album of the Year Grammy Award.

Hancock appeared on the 2014 Flying Lotus album You’re Dead and his new album is eagerly awaited with likely contributions from Wayne Shorter, Kendrick Lamar, Kamasi Washington and – yes – Snoop Dogg. We will no doubt feature it here on Cosmic Jazz but, until then, here’s to Herbie Hancock – eighty years young!

Week ending 27 April 2019: spiritual sounds and more

There are contrasting moods in this week’s Cosmic Jazz show –  available via the MixCloud tab (left). The first half is on the deep, intense, even spiritual side while the second section of the show is more obviously funky – but still retaining that deep vibe we like so much.

I search my record shelves on a regular basis to find music that I have not played for some time and bring it to the show. Often I discover some great music that needs to be aired – and so it was this week. The disc selected came from Yuko Fujiyama, a pianist born in Japan, who moved to New York after encountering the music of Cecil Taylor. One night in New York in 1980 she heard someone playing a tape of Taylor’s music and this inspiration led to the free approach to improvisation characterised by this music. The album Reentry was recorded in 2000 at the Gilbert Recital Hall, Canton, New York. The track selected is titled Synaethesis and is the opening tune on the album, which gives a good idea of what the album is like. I cannot remember where or when I bought this record but I’m very pleased I did. I notice its Discogs listing gives the record five stars – I endorse that fully.

From the spiritual side came John Ellis and his album Evolution, Seeds and Streams, whose title provides a good feel for what the music is like. It was released in 2016 on the Manchester-based Gondwana label and was commissioned for the Manchester Jazz Festival. John Ellis is a pianist/keyboard player but the record includes some instruments and sounds that are not commonly found on a jazz record – kora, cello, vocal sculpture, birdsong and beatbox.

Last week the show finally caught up with the Polish sax player from Warsaw Michal Kobojek and his album The Outside. The music was so good that a second tune seemed appropriate this week. He not only leads his own group but also plays as a session musician and with other musicians, including vocalist Urszula Dudziak (who may be known to Cosmic Jazz listeners) and saxophonist Michal Urbaniak, who we have played on the show.

By this stage the mood of the programme was beginning to shift, although only moderately with another tune from Wayne Shorter’s award winning epic 2018 album EmanonThere  was a heavier even thumping feel, however, from Theon Cross who plays the tuba, another instrument that is not found on many jazz records. He’s one of the members of the thriving young London jazz scene and has just released his first album Fyah. As with many of his contemporaries, his music crosses boundaries – from early New Orleans jazz to grime and rap. On the tune Brockley from the excellent Gilles Peterson-curated compilation album We Out Here, Cross is joined by two other members of the scene, drummer Moses Boyd and sax player Nubya Garcia.

Hammond organ player Charles Earland may have been too funky, too soulful and too much loved by the Acid Jazz crowd for many jazz followers. They have missed some gems. In 2001 Soul Brother Records in the UK released a 2CD anthology of his music. It includes three tunes from Leaving This Planet – considered one of his finest albums. One of these tunes is a version of the Freddie Hubbard’s Red Clay with no less than Hubbard himself playing on it, as well as sax player Joe Henderson and drummer Harvey Mason. This should be enough to confirm Earland’s jazz credentials.

There was more from what might be described as the jazz dance scene. Kathryn Moses is a Brazilian-influenced jazz vocalist who appears on a compilation put together by British DJ Kevin Beadle. UK record labels have done much to promote Brazilian music and the now Brighton-based label Mr. Bongo has been one of the leaders. Their superb seven CD Brazilian Beats series (available in a box set) includes on Volume 3 a tune from distinctive vocalist Seu Jorge. To end Cosmic Jazz this week we went to the title track from the excellent 1977 Soul Village album from Fender Rhodes pianist Walter Bishop Jr. featuring Randy Brecker on trumpet and flugelhorn.

  1. Yoko Fujiyama – Synaethesis from Re-entry
  2. John Ellis – Flight from Evolution, Seeds & Streams
  3. Machal Kobojek – Imago from The Outside
  4. Wayne Shorter – Adventures Aboard the Golden Mean from Emanon
  5. Theon Cross – Brockley from We Out Here
  6. Charles Earland – Red Clay from Anthology
  7. Kathryn Moses – Music in my Heart from Kevin Beadle presents Private Collection Vol 2
  8. Seu Jorge – Chega No Suingue from Brazilian Beats Vol. 3
  9. Walter Bishop Jr. – Soul Village from Soul Village

Derek is listening to …..

  1. Ruby Rushton – Moonlight Woman ( Studio Session)
  2. Nick Walters & the Paradox Ensemble – Dear Old Thing
  3. Alfa Mist – Keep On
  4. Bitty McLean – Walk Away from Love
  5. Steve Williamson – Celestial Blues

 

 

08 September 2016: CJ playout!

vinyl-hunter

Cosmic Jazz‘s local specialist vinyl store (yes, we have one!) is the excellent Vinyl Hunter in Bury St Edmunds. There’s a great selection of new and used records, all the equipment you need to set up your first vinyl sound system along with excellent coffee and cakes too. It’s a haven of great sounds – and their Rough Trade-style practice of writing informative sleeve notes on all new vinyl is a good example of their attention to detail.

img_7877Following their return from Brazil, owner Rosie Hunter and son Will arrived back with an armful of rare Brazilian grooves and at CJ we thought that this was a good opportunity to spin some of our own treasured discs instore. Thanks to Vinyl Hunter‘s two Technics PL 1210s and sound system (along with a CD deck) customers enjoyed three hours of quality samba, bossa nova, drum and bass and more.

img_7883On 10 September, Vinyl Hunter will celebrate their first anniversary. It’s worth a visit to Bury St Edmunds to support this excellent new music outlet. If you’re not already into vinyl, now’s the time to start – let Ross and Will guide you and you’ll emerge with great sounds and the beginning of a lifelong music habit.

16 April 2016: RSD2016

16 April was Record Store Day all round the world and – of course –  Cosmic Jazz joined in the festivities.  We visited two of our local record stores – Soundclash logoSoundclash Records in Norwich and Vinyl Hunter in Bury St Edmunds. Soundclash is one of the city’s oldest record shops: established in 1991, it’s got a great selection of both vinyl and CDs in a wide range of musical genres. Vinyl Hunter maybe new in town but it’s already building a loyal customer base.  Not only is it a specialist vinyl store (with some CDs) but there’s cafe space downstairs too and – thanks to the bakery upstairs there are excellent cakes and coffee. Vinyl vinyl hunter logoHunter also carries a range of quality turntables including Lenco and Rega models – and co-founder Rosie Hunter made clear that selling good quality decks on which to play both new and secondhand vinyl is just part of their comprehensive service for customers.

soundclash record store day 01Those early morning Soundclash queues are testimony to the appeal of Record Store Day and – like the Norwich store – Vinyl Hunter had a busy inaugural RSD2016 with over 60 customers buying in the first hour. Their crate digging approach is going global too – in August the Hunters will be visiting Brazil for the Olympic Games, but Rosie confirmed that there will be time for some vinyl hunting in some of the country’s best record stores!

UK vinyl sales continue to grow year on year with a 64% increase in 2015 sales over the previous year. What looked like a passing fad is clearly now a substantial resurgence. Independent vinyl shops are a viable business proposition – the longevity of Soundclavinyl hunter 01sh and the customer service ethos of Vinyl Hunter are both testimony to this. What HMV (the sole surviving major music retailer) never succeeded in doing was to rebrand themselves as a specialist, niche service – and that’s where two of our local record shops have the edge. Cosmic Jazz salutes both. For more vinyl news, start with The Vinyl Factory or sign up to any of the other great independent record store around the country.  The music choices below celebrate RSD exclusive cuts and more – enjoy!

On Record Store Day Neil listened to: 

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Meanwhile, our Miles Ahead fest continues: Neil has chosen five Miles Davis tracks, each of which featured in Jez Nelson’s Sunday night Somethin’ Else prograjez nelson and don cheadlemme on Jazz FM. Much of this is Miles music that is rarely heard on the radio – and as actor/director Don Cheadle notes in his interview with Nelson, some of these tracks often centre on “meta-Miles” – Davis playing what’s not there. The music built up to the period in Miles’ life that’s at the heart of the movie – his enforced retirement from 1975 that then led to the final comeback years. The interview ended with Cheadle’s choice of Circle, from the album Miles Smiles.

On Somethin’ Else Neil listened to:

The greatest week in avantgarde jazz?

There’s a question mark at the end of this feature title – but it probably doesn’t need to be there. In one week in August 1969, a group of American musicians holed up just north of Paris produced over 12 albums worth of material. The writer Britt Robson has produced an absorbing feature for Red Bull Academy Daily and it’s so good it deserves to be read by our CJ listeners. You can check out the article here. It begins like this…

Thank God somebody bought Lester Bowie’s couch in the spring of 1969. And his chairs, bed and desk. Otherwise, the most glorious week in avant-garde jazz history would never have happened. “Lester was selling all the furniture in his house to take the band to Europe,” recalls saxophonist Roscoe Mitchell of his trumpeter-friend and cohort. “He put an ad in the [Chicago] Defender, ‘Musician sells out.’”

jazzactuel compilationMuch of the music was to appear of the BYG label, a short lived but influential avantgarde jazz imprint founded in Paris by Jean Georgakarakos, Jean-Luc Young and Fernand Boruso. You should still be able to find the 3CD collection called JazzActuel: a collection of avant garde/free jazz/psychedelia from the BYG/Actuel catalogue of 1969–1971. It was released by Charly Records in the UK.

[With grateful thanks to Britt Robson for his insightful writing. You can find more of his work on the Wondering Sound blog.]

Mark Murphy 1932-2015: an appreciation

mark murphy 01The first thing to say is that Mark Murphy was an icon. A living embodiment of Kerouac ‘hipster’ chic, Murphy truly lived the jazz life. No other jazz artist presented this so clearly through his music: Murphy recorded Kerouac stories, he wrote lyrics for modern jazz standards that incorporated bebop imagery and with his resonant baritone he nailed that mix of jazz phrasing and vocalese better than anyone. Modern singers from Kurt Elling to Gregory Porter owe him a huge debt. The shame is that in the wake of his death there aren’t the column inches to reflect that influence.

Mark Murphy was born in Syracuse, New York, joining his brother’s dance band as a teenage singer. Influences were already clear – Nat King Cole, Anita O’Day and Ella Fitzgerald. Murphy was always interested in acting (he graduated in music and drama) and would go back to the stage and television when he wasn’t recording.

In 1958 he briefly moved to Los Angeles and recorded for Capitolmark murphy rah
before returning to New York and recording the Rah! album on Riverside Records. This featured versions of Horace Silver’s Doodlin’ and the standard On Green Dolphin Street. But perhaps the most productive time for Murphy was the 1970s and his time with the Muse label. These consistently good recordings feature him at his eclectic best. Albums
like Bop for Kerouac, Beauty and the Beast and – above all – Stolen mark murphy stolen momentsMoments feature imaginative arrangements, original lyrics and
great productions. Stolen Moments has the inspirational title track, Murphy’s take on Herbie Hancock’s Sly and his soaring vocals on Dori Caymmi’s sensational Like a Love(r) (O Cantador) which close the album. Several of these eighteen Muse albums – including Stolen Moments – were nominated for Grammy awards.

Murphy has also appeared on records by the Japanese nu-jazz group United Future Organization where he wrote and rapped lyrics on songs composed with his young collaborators. This collaboration opened up further new audiences in the acid-jazz and hip-hop genres, most notably in his fabulous (literally) lyrics for Dingwalls, in which he name-checked the famous north London venue where jazz dancers showed how timeless his music was.

mark murphy love is what staysWith a new Verve contract, he recorded Once to Every Heart in 2005 and Love is What Stays in 2007. Both albums featured Murphy on a range of ballads and were produced by German trumpeter Till Bronner. But for a different take on 21C Murphy try this innovative Henrik Schwartz remix from 2012. Murphy’s last recording – fittingly a limited edition on vinyl only and through the UK-based Gearbox Records – was a tribute to another iconic singer, Murphy’s contemporary Shirley Horn. Beautiful Friendship: Remembering Shirley Horn was released in 2013.

Two British DJs (both much beloved by this site) – Gilles Peterson and Patrick Forge – have produced their own heartfelt tributes to Murphy. Here’s Peterson’s Mark Murphy mix from 2008 and we end this celebration of Murphy’s music with these fitting words from Forge on Facebook: So waking up today I’m filled with sadness at Mark’s passing, last time I saw him was in Tokyo, I went to his gig with Shuya Okino, he seemed very frail but was still just as mesmerising in performance, still taking risks, in the moment, going where the music took him. We chatted afterwards and I remember thinking as we left that it would probably be the last time. I’ll always remember interviewing Mark after one of his shows at Dingwalls, and asking him about the lyrics to Red Clay… he told me about how he’d phoned Freddie Hubbard to ask him about where the title had come from, Freddie had told him about playing on the red clay growing up in Indianopolis. Mark’s lyrics are so wonderfully evocative, they seem to capture a whole world, joyful and playful and naturally hip. Maybe “hip” seems an odd word to use, but Mark was an original hipster, a product and devotee of the “Beat Generation” who lovingly crafted music around Jack Kerouac’s words on more than one occasion. Like those writers, his defiance of the humdrum, his pursuit of truth and beauty, his questing soul was always searching for the chance to take flight… Mark’s voice had wings that grew out of the original counter culture, made of poetry and jazz. We have lost a consummate singer, a superb lyricist who could create sublime poetry around great jazz melodies, a fearless improviser and a legendary character. R.I.P.

I also saw Murphy live, but here in the UK in a small jazz club in the heart of rural Suffolk – a lifetime away from New York or Tokyo. It was a never to be forgotten experience, but as soon as I’m back from Beijing I’ll be reliving that classic voice all over again when all those Murphy albums are once more on the turntable.